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March 25, 2004

Well, to remind myself...

...after the post below, there were times when Englishmen's homes were legally their castle...

Well, as long as you weren't Catholic, or a Jew. And, as noted in an earlier post - a Welshman.

Note to my Brit readers... I know I'm mixing things up in that the right to be inviolable in your home from literally un-warranted intrusion is *not* the same thing as being able to defend yourself in it under the law. English history is replete with examples of the government disarming the citizenry. Which is at least one reason (and perhaps the most important) why the Founders put the 2nd Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

by John on Mar 25, 2004

March 23, 2004

Gratuitous Gun Pic

Another data crash starts today, and I'm still working the second ammunition post (it's gonna be wordy, too, JD!). Here is a pic of the Swedes in the collection to keep you interested.

All the major variants of the Swedish Mauser save the M84 carbine and a sniper rifle. On the bottom is a Ljungman, the Swede M1. Very efficient little pepperpot muzzle break on that rifle - really annoying to the guy on your left and right!

by John on Mar 23, 2004

February 20, 2004

Speaking of remodeling houses...

...since there seem to be several bloggers in the throes of that as we are at Castle Argghhh!. I wonder, if I can either rebuild the current Castle Argghhh! or find a new one of sufficient size, if the SWWBO, Mistress of Argghhh! will allow me this for furniture...

This is the "Organ of Muskets" at Springfield Armory - this is how muskets were stored after build/rebuild awaiting issue. I want. I want. Too bad it's the only surviving one, so I can't have it.

Waaaaah!

by John on Feb 20, 2004
» Technicalities links with: Friday Afternoon Wanderings
» Les Jones Blog links with: Tuesday Gun Links #6

February 09, 2004

Gratitous Gun Pic

Too busy this morning for anything else - gratuitous gun pic to keep you animals calm. Mostly Soviet Mosins and Tokarevs with a Finn M39, and a couple of Swedes finding their way into the picture...

by John on Feb 09, 2004

January 16, 2004

And for you guys who were into the french stuff yesterday...

(aren't all men into 'french stuff?')

Here is the upper portion of the French wall.

On top, a Chassepot, the french 'needle gun'.
Then the Gras, the cartridge conversion.
Then the Kropatschek, the inspiration for the Lebel.
Then a M1907/15 Berthier/Lebel.
Then two versions of the Berthier carbine... and since I'm in a hurry I have of course forgotten the nomenclatures! Wait - M1916!
And last, if the R35 carbine version of the M1886 Lebel rifle - which is in yesterday's pic.

Update: As I slip into "French Bashing" here now and again, I should make something clear. Unlike many of my fellow-travelers, I respect the individual French soldier for his individual courage, endurance, and willingness to risk all for his people. But I have little respect for the governments and senior military leaders (there are exceptions, GEN Gamelin, for example was trying very hard to modernize the french army prior to WWII) who lead/misused and abused those soldiers. So, in short, where I make (or let stand unchallenged) the old "only dropped once" kind of comments, I am intending it as a slap on the leaders, not the led. The French High Command and political leadership of WWI (like the Brits, frankly) were unworthy of the sacrifice they demanded of their soldiery.

Dans le Français traduit par ordinateur :: Pendant que je glisse dans l'"Français frappant" ici de temps en temps, je devrais rendre quelque chose de clair. À la différence de plusieurs de mes camarade-voyageurs, je respecte le soldat français individuel pour que son courage, résistance, et bonne volonté individuels risque tous pour ses personnes. Mais je fais respecter peu pour les gouvernements et les chefs militaires aînés (il y a les exceptions, GEN Gamelin, par exemple essayait très dur de moderniser l'armée française avant WWII) qui lead/misused et maltraité ces soldats. Ainsi, en bref, où je fais (ou laissez le stand incontesté) le vieux "seulement une fois laissé tomber" genre de commentaires, je le prévois comme claque sur les chefs, pas mené. La commande élevée française et la conduite politique de WWI (comme le Brits, franchement) étaient indignes du sacrifice qu'elles ont exigé de leur soldiery.

by John on Jan 16, 2004

January 15, 2004

Another gratuitous gun pic.

One thing I have to say about my french rifles (most of which went from France to Arab nations, and then into the surplus market) is that despite the number of users and wars the users fought in - the weapons are in pretty good shape. Compared, say, to german, british, and russian weapons (though the arsenal reworks are nice).

Here's the lower part of my "French Wall".

Just partially visible is a Berthier M1916 rifle.
That's followed my a M1883/M93/R35 Lebel, with the correct short bayonet.
Next is a pre-war MAS M1936 that got the post-war rework (for you grognards out there who know what you are looking at!)
Next is a Syrian contract MAS 49. Anybody having the french version and do not want it anymore, drop me a line... if you don't know the difference, the french version does not have the integral bayonet - that is a feature of the Syrian rifles.
That's followed by a MAS 36/LG48, a post-war MAS 36 with an integral grenade launcher.
Last, but not least, the MAS 49/56 a product-improved MAS 49, and the first rifle in a long time for the french that had a blade bayonet rather than a cruciform spike.

Cheers, all - off to the Evil Squirrel's Nut Mines.

Update: As I slip into "French Bashing" here now and again, I should make something clear. Unlike many of my fellow-travelers, I respect the individual French soldier for his individual courage, endurance, and willingness to risk all for his people. But I have little respect for the governments and senior military leaders (there are exceptions, GEN Gamelin, for example was trying very hard to modernize the french army prior to WWII) who lead/misused and abused those soldiers. So, in short, where I make (or let stand unchallenged) the old "only dropped once" kind of comments, I am intending it as a slap on the leaders, not the led. The French High Command and political leadership of WWI (like the Brits, frankly) were unworthy of the sacrifice they demanded of their soldiery.

Dans le Français traduit par ordinateur :: Pendant que je glisse dans l'"Français frappant" ici de temps en temps, je devrais rendre quelque chose de clair. À la différence de plusieurs de mes camarade-voyageurs, je respecte le soldat français individuel pour que son courage, résistance, et bonne volonté individuels risque tous pour ses personnes. Mais je fais respecter peu pour les gouvernements et les chefs militaires aînés (il y a les exceptions, GEN Gamelin, par exemple essayait très dur de moderniser l'armée française avant WWII) qui lead/misused et maltraité ces soldats. Ainsi, en bref, où je fais (ou laissez le stand incontesté) le vieux "seulement une fois laissé tomber" genre de commentaires, je le prévois comme claque sur les chefs, pas mené. La commande élevée française et la conduite politique de WWI (comme le Brits, franchement) étaient indignes du sacrifice qu'elles ont exigé de leur soldiery.

by John on Jan 15, 2004
» King of Fools links with: Interesting Links

September 30, 2003

Mo Guns, Mo' Betta.

Y'all got stiffed on a gun pic yesterday. Tough. Life intrudes sometimes. As does my ever-expanding universe of goofs with Moveable Type. Which ain't MT's fault. It's operator headspace and timing. Like the big post that I just blew away...

Anyway, here 'tis yer new pic for the day.

This is my 'Murican wall. The sharp-eyed among ya will notice three furrin' weapons in the pic. At top, a M1763 Charleville musket, 3rd from the top, a French Model 1802 flintlock converted to percussion, and ninth down, a M1910 Ross. The french provided 23000 stands of Charleville muskets to the Continental army during the revolution. The first US musket produced at Springfield Arsenal (pics of museum here), the M1795, was based on the Charleville. This one is a repro - I don't have the bucks for a real one. Fun to shoot though. The M1802s were provided to both the North and South during the War of North/South Grumpiness. There is no provenance for this gun, so let's assume it's Union (so no point in trying to steal it, goblins). The Ross is one of 20,000 or so that were bought by the US gov't for training during the early days of WWII, and is US Ordnance marked.

Skipping on down, the second rifle is a US M1842 percussion conversion, number 4 is a Remington Zouave (note to goblins - a repro), followed by a M1872 Springfield Trapdoor, then a US-marked Remington Rolling Block. They are out of chronological order because of bayonet length interfering with the shelves. They are followed by a M1895 Krag, M1903 Springfield, the Ross, and on the bottom, a M1917 Enfield, built at Eddystone. I have a Vivien-Bessiere grenade launcher for that rifle. There's more down below, but that's a pic for another day.

Chatter away.

by John on Sep 30, 2003

September 28, 2003

Let's Give Senator Schumer some Indigestion, Shall We?

Here's a pic of the Russian wall. At the bottom, due to wallspace constraints, my Swedes reside. But, they aren't in this pic, so, no problem! What you see here is several flavors of russian smoke-pole. At top, a Berdan II (designed by american Hiram Berdan, of Berdan's Sharpshooters in the Civil War), a single-shot bolt action, made by Stevens in Maastricht. I recently scored a bayonet for this fella, but haven't taken a picture yet. Next under are some Mosin-Nagants. Two M91s, top dated 1893, second one dated 1920. The first is purely Imperial marked. The second is Soviet-marked, but still has a hex receiver (vice round) and the arshin sight. Both have older, ring-lock bayonets. Next is a M91-30, pure Soviet. Fourth is a M91-30 Sniper. Next under is the soviet "M1 Garand", an SVT-40, semi-auto in a full-auto stock, with a semi-auto muzzle break. Next under him is an SVT-40 carbine, with SVT-40 bayonet. This gun is SA marked, and may be either a gun repaired to carbine length, or a gun made after the war for the collectors market. Hard to say - but it isn't import-marked. It is probably not a built-from-the-ground-up carbine. Beneath that carbine is a Chinese copy of the M44 carbine, this one being a papered vet bring-back from Korea.

Have fun, gotta run!

by John on Sep 28, 2003