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Your Medal of Honor Moment for 30 June

There are fourteen Medals awarded for actions on this day, spanning from the Civil War to Vietnam - but skipping WWI, WWII, and Korea, which is kind of interesting.

Civil War
BRONNER, AUGUST F.

Rank and organization: Private, Company C, 1st New York Artillery
Place and date: At White Oak Swamp, Va., 30 June 1862. At Malvern Hill, Va., 1 July 1862
Date of issue: Unknown
Citation: Continued to fight after being severely wounded.

BURKE, THOMAS

Rank and organization: Private, Company A, 5th New York Cavalry
Place and date: At Hanover Courthouse, Va., 30 June 1863
Date of issue: 11 February 1878
Citation: Capture of battle flag.

HOWARD, HENDERSON C.

Rank and organization: Corporal, Company B, 11th Pennsylvania Reserves
Place and date: At Glendale, Va., 30 June 1862
Entered service at: Indiana, Pa.
Date of issue: 30 March 1898
Citation: While pursuing one of the enemy's sharpshooters, encountered 2 others, whom he bayoneted in hand-to-hand encounters; was 3 times wounded in action.

KING, RUFUS, JR.

Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, 4th U.S. Artillery
Place and date: At White Oak Swamp Bridge, Va., 30 June 1862
Entered service at: New York
Date of issue: 2 April 1898
Citation: This officer, when his captain was wounded, succeeded to the command of two batteries while engaged against a superior force of the enemy and fought his guns most gallantly until compelled to retire.

LEVY, BENJAMIN

Rank and organization: Private, Company B, 1st New York Infantry
Place and date: At Glendale, Va., 30 June 1862
Date of issue: 1 March 1865
Citation: This soldier, a drummer boy, took the gun of a sick comrade, went into the fight, and when the color bearers were shot down, carried the colors and saved them from capture.

McMAHON, MARTIN T.

Rank and organization: Captain, and aide-de-camp U.S. Volunteers
Place and date: At White Oak Swamp, Va., 30 June i862
Entered service at: California
Date of issue: 10 March 1891
Citation: Under fire of the enemy, successfully destroyed a valuable train that had been abandoned and prevented it from falling into the hands of the enemy.

SHAMBAUGH, CHARLES

Rank and organization: Corporal, Company D, 11th Pennsylvania Reserves
Place and date: At Charles City Crossroads, Va., 30 June 1862
Entered service at: Indiana County, Pa.
Date of issue: 17 July 1866
Citation: Capture of flag.

UHRL, GEORGE

Rank and organization: Sergeant, Light Battery F, 5th U.S. Artillery
Place and date: At White Oak Swamp Bridge, Va.. 30 June 1862
Date of issue: 4 April 1898
Citation: Was 1 of a party of 3 who, under heavy fire of advancing enemy, voluntarily secured and saved from capture a field gun belonging to another battery, and which had been deserted by its officers and men.Place and date: At White Oak Swamp, Va., 30 June 1862. At Malvern Hill, Va., 1 July 1862
Date of issue: Unknown
Citation: Continued to fight after being severely wounded.

War With Spain
BELL, DENNIS

Rank and organization: Private, Troop H, 10th U.S. Cavalry
Place and date: At Tayabacoa, Cuba, 30 June 1898
Entered service at: Washington, D.C.
Date of issue: 23 June 1899
Citation: Voluntarily went ashore in the face of the enemy and aided in the rescue of his wounded comrades; this after several previous attempts at rescue had been frustrated.

LEE, FITZ

Rank and organization: Private, Troop M, 10th U.S. Cavalry
Place and date: At Tayabacoa, Cuba, 30 June 1898
Entered service at: Dinwiddie County, Va.
Date of issue: 23 June 1899
Citation: Voluntarily went ashore in the face of the enemy and aided in the rescue of his wounded comrades; this after several previous attempts had been frustrated.

MULLER, FREDERICK

Rank and organization: Mate, U.S. Navy
Accredited to: Massachusetts
G.O. No.: 45, 30 April 1901
Citation: On board the U.S.S. Wompatuck, Manzanillo, Cuba, 30 June 1898. Serving under the fire of the enemy, Muller displayed heroism and gallantry during this period.

THOMPKINS, WILLIAM H.

Rank and organization: Private, Troop G, 10th U.S. Cavalry
Place and date: At Tayabacoa, Cuba, 30 June 1898
Entered service at: Paterson, N.J.
Date of issue: 23 June 1899
Citation. Voluntarily went ashore in the face of the enemy and aided in the rescue of his wounded comrades; this after several previous attempts at rescue had been frustrated.
Interim Awards, 1901-1911
FADDEN, HARRY D.

Rank and organization: Coxswain, U.S. Navy
Accredited to: Washington
G.O. No.: 138, 31 July 1903
Citation: On board the U.S.S. Adams, for gallantry, rescuing O.C. Hawthorne, landsman for training, from drowning at sea, 30 June 1903.

Vietnam
*LONG, DONALD RUSSELL

Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Troop C, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Infantry Division
Place and Date: Republic of Vietnam, 30 June 1966
Date of Issue: 04/04/1968
Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Troops B and C, while conducting a reconnaissance mission along a road were suddenly attacked by a Viet Cong regiment, supported by mortars, recoilless rifles and machine guns, from concealed positions astride the road. Sgt. Long abandoned the relative safety of his armored personnel carrier and braved a withering hail of enemy fire to carry wounded men to evacuation helicopters. As the platoon fought its way forward to resupply advanced elements, Sgt. Long repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire at point blank range to provide the needed supplies. While assaulting the Viet Cong position, Sgt. Long inspired his comrades by fearlessly standing unprotected to repel the enemy with rifle fire and grenades as they attempted to mount his carrier. When the enemy threatened to overrun a disabled carrier nearby, Sgt. Long again disregarded his own safety to help the severely wounded crew to safety. As he was handing arms to the less seriously wounded and reorganizing them to press the attack, an enemy grenade was hurled onto the carrier deck. Immediately recognizing the imminent danger, he instinctively shouted a warning to the crew and pushed to safety one man who had not heard his warning over the roar of battle. Realizing that these actions would not fully protect the exposed crewmen from the deadly explosion, he threw himself over the grenade to absorb the blast and thereby saved the lives of 8 of his comrades at the expense of his life. Throughout the battle, Sgt. Long's extraordinary heroism, courage and supreme devotion to his men were in the finest tradition of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself and the U.S. Army.

*Indicates posthumous award.