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The Southern Cross of Honor

Also known as the "Confederate Medal of Honor."

John (NTA) opined thusly in a comment on one of my Medal of Honor posts:
There were (as far as I know) no Confederate States of America awards for heroism. As we read of the heroic deeds of our northern born ancestors, we should not lose sight of the considerable heroism from the military forces from the southern part of our now re-united nation.

We must remember their deeds as well, as many military members today have long family histories of military service in the U.S. (and a few with C.S.) service to be proud of.

There was, in fact, a Medal of Honor for the Confederacy, established in 1862.  But, even though I am a direct lineal descendant of three Confederate soldiers, I am not going to mix them into the lists of the United States Medal of Honor.  Leave aside that there is no detail available commensurate with the (limited) citation data available for Civil War era Union awards, like it or not, to list the Confederate Medals in my US listing would be similar to adding in Victoria Crosses, Croix du Guerre, and, more aptly, Pour Le Merite holders.  

Those soldiers earned their honors trying very hard to *not* be US soldiers, and I am going to honor their wishes in that regard.

But for those with an interest in that aspect of Southern history - here's a list of recipients of the Confederate Medal of Honor.  

[NB: Link fixed]
 

4 Comments

I have at least a company's worth of ancestors who served in the Civil War. Not a single one in Union Blue. I'm not prepared to accept that an award established by an hereditary society is anything but an award established by an hereditary society, an 1862 piece of legislation not withstanding. Since it was never awarded and since the CSA ceased to exist in 1865, the award became extinct and this award has no connection to it.

The Society of the Cinncinati and the Sons of the American Revolution both issue very fine medals. This one fits into that category albeit it honors the veteran, not the descendant.
 
recipients of the Confederate Medal of Honor.

Linky no workee GI

 
 No, it doesn't.  Hmmm.  I will work on that.
 
 Centurion - the intent of the Confederate Congress was clear, and as they were unable to produce the medals, the War Department *did* create the "Roll of Honor" said enrollees to be awarded Medals pending a successful conclusion of the war.

That didn't happen, and what you related, did.  I would aver, however, the being on the Roll of Honor suffices in the context of the post and J(NTA)s comment.

And just further reinforces why I don't include them in the series, regardless.

The link is fixed, I believe.