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Danger Will Robinson! Danger!

Flee!

07/24/2013 - U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Nichole Dennis, with the 94th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, locates the position of her team during navigation, evasion and recovery training July 24, 2013, as part of Global Medic 2013 at Fort McCoy, Wis. Global Medic is a joint U.S. Air Force Reserve-U.S. Army Reserve field training exercise for theater aeromedical evacuation system and ground medical components designed to replicate all aspects of combat medical service support. (DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Heather Cozad, U.S. Air Force/Released)
07/24/2013 - U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Nichole Dennis, with the 94th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, locates the position of her team during navigation, evasion and recovery training July 24, 2013, as part of Global Medic 2013 at Fort McCoy, Wis. Global Medic is a joint U.S. Air Force Reserve-U.S. Army Reserve field training exercise for theater aeromedical evacuation system and ground medical components designed to replicate all aspects of combat medical service support. (DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Heather Cozad, U.S. Air Force/Released)

[NB: No personal disrespect to 1LT Dennis in particular, who may not actually be a threat - this is a generalized warning many here will recognize - the Armorer]

25 Comments

Greetings:

Obviously, our fair LT hasn't gotten to the couture part of her training yet.  Cammies cannot, should not, will not be mixed and matched.  You either buy the whole outfit or go back home to your daddy.
 
Well, she *is* AF.  And AFRES at that. 
 
I thought it was a 2Lt with a map that was hazardous. Prolly extends further north with AF types.

In the Navy it was Ensigns and a chart.
 
Well, at least she's a FIRST lieutenant; just so long (according to what a navigator told me about her SERE experience) they don't have redundant navigators on their team, it'll be OK.
 
Actually it is a lieutenant with a map AND radio that is dangerous.
 
Sombody should slap her supply Sgt.  What kind of helmet is she wearing anyway, strange chinstrap.
 
That just the old k-pot, and she's wearing the strap improperly. It should be actually over the end of the chin, not under the jaw.

And I've actually gone to the range/field with an ensemble that resembled that, back in the days when the ACU was still fairly new.  I was in an AC/RC unit at Ft Lewis, and since we weren't a deploying unit, we got k-pots instead of the new ACH helmets(yes, I know that's redundant).  Anyway, CIF didn't have ACU pattern covers for the k-pots, only woodland pattern.  On top of that, the body armor vests we were issued were DCU pattern.

To complete the absurity of the outfit, most of us, except a couple of guys who had come from the Stryker brigade on post (and thus hadn't had to turn in all their old gear to CIF) were still using the old school LBEs, just like JtA wore during his salad days.
 
When it comes to personal equipment, the AF gets the Army's seconds and the AFRes get the leftovers from that. From my expreience, that fact that she even has a cloth cover on her brain bucket is a plus.
 
Funny, I woulda thought the danger would be more of a fire danger from all the candles on the cake.
Another lap complete!
Happy Birthday, John!!
0>:~}
 
 Piling On: When I had SERE training and was taught the use of camo face-paint, we weren't taught that lipstick was part of the pattern to break up the outline of the face....hey, no offense OneEllTee, we had plenty 40th AeroMed Evac Squadron nurses attached to the 446th MAW (AFRES) when I flew C-141Bs for that outfit for a couple years in the late '70s. There was almost no ground training for them, though, and I don't think they went to SERE school, either.
 
Hopefully the area is fenced so they don't get to lost....
 
Can't get lost - it's Fort McCoy. 5 miles in just about any direction and you will hit civilization. One of the smallest Army posts around. It was actually on the 'hit list' until 9/11 and someone had the brains to figure out it would be a great mobilization/training facility.
 
Eh, I don't think that's the old steel k-pot, but the first "fritz" kevlar helmut. I did find an old steel helmet in one of the supply rooms we had, and my LT almost had kittens. My first cdr. at 11th Chemical was the person I knew who wore a "large" kevlar. 

As far as the organizational equipment being mismatched, go back an look pictures of the first year or two in Iraq. There was a *lot* of green LBE and body armor on top of "chocolate chip" uniforms. As for the lipstick, betcha it's the first day in the field; betcha the LT left from her residence as per usual and naturally put on lipstick.
 
CCO - "k-pot" refers to the !st gen kevlar helmet. We called its predecessor the "steel pot." nbsp;
 
Trying to be circumspect after that last comment of mine.

  Lessee, well, the light in the pic made the AF camo work to start with. I had to look a bit to see a human form, but then I saw the face. Yup, that's a human woman, all right.  We XY guys can detect that at an amazing distance in obscure visual conditions. If she had a sense of humor, she'd put on green lipstick (I'm sure somebody makes it) or maybe blue to match the camo.
 
Wait!  The Army makes green lipstick! (they just don't call it that) Brown, too.
 
P.s. Nice compass: I wish I had one.  Hey, note her perfect posture! It's much better than mine ever was, even when I was young and could stand up straight. Looks like ballet or gymnastic training to me.

Say, DL, you might be able to get your very own entry on Skiippy's List with some creative use of Army camo face paint as makeup.

The general form of Skippy's List is that it seems to be a list of "counseling" statements which the offender signs and promises never to do again what was described.
 
This idea has possibilities: How can a female troop use the Army camo face paint (black, green, and brown, IIRC) as makeup while still staying one millimeter short of crossing the line? That is, called in for "counseling", but not exactly brought up on charges. I think supplementing the green lips with vampire fangs might get things started. Just tell 'em yer imitating your hero, Deathwish Drang.
 
Re: equipment...what Oldloadr said.

OTOH, the absolutely coolest kit I EVER saw were the Weather toads deployed to support Army air ops (an oxymoron, I know, but still...). All their stuff was amazing--but they were funded by AMC, not ACC/USAFE/PACAF. Ever seen a "tactical" field generator? Damn near have to be standing next to it to hear it. If they really wanna be quiet, they just bury the thing and vent it appropriately. 

That said, after I put SecAF in a ROMAD's ruck, complete with 1950s technology radios, spare batteries and water, we got some cash to buy stuff that wasn't made for the Army in 1965. Spent 250K+ in 17 minutes (everything from personal- to unit-level stuff)...which is why you bottom-of-the-barrel units should have a whole s**tload of Form 9s standing by for whenever some 4-banger comes by with a little spare change in his/her pocket.
 
CCO- "old" is a relative term.  Since I joined the Army in 1996, to me "old" refers to kit we had back then that isn't used (much) anymore...like the PASGT helmet (replaced by the MICH/ACH), BDUs, MREs in dark brown bags, the LBE, the M923/925 series 5-tons, the grey PT sweat suits (we'll soon have a second and stupider go 'round on replacing those)...

I'm sure for John and others here "old" refers to stuff a generation or more older than that.
 
Yeah! Hey, wait...
 
We had a lieutenant who complained about the 'ore in the ground' making it hard to navigate. Of course he was steadying his compass on the windshield frame of our Studebaker-built 2 1/2 ton at the time. He inadvertently inspired me to go to OCS, I figured I could easily do a better job than him.
 
John- RE: k-pot; I'm not a member fo the Chigger Nation (see http://chiggernation.com/inspiration/; see also http://www.blackfive.net/main/2013/07/facebook-saying-chiggers-is-racist.html#more); but I nevertheless stand corrected. 
 
I have a (probably) true story told to me by a soldier having to do with 2nd-Lieutenant+map+compass. This guy was "leading " them on a night-time land navigation exercise, and managed to march them into an area where live artillery ammo was falling from the sky. This was at Fort Leonard Wood.

According to my storyteller, he and some of his buds managed to meet this lieutenant in town a bit later, in the proverbial dark alley. My interlocutor thought it prudent to volunteer to go to Viet-Nam, rather than stick around for any investigations which might have come of that.
 

 You're really proud of that Studebaker deuce, aren't you Martin?

When in command at Fort Riley 86-88, I had a Studebaker-built deuce, too.