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Around the military world...



PACIFIC OCEAN (May 21, 2013) The amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) fires a surface to air intercept missile from it's Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launcher while off the coast of California during a live-fire exercise. New Orleans is underway conducting a certification in preparation to deploy to the U.S. 5th Fleet and U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary Granger Jr.)



Three F-22 Raptors land May 17, 2013, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The Raptors were flown by Reserve pilots assigned to the 302nd Fighter Squadron during a recent 477th Fighter Group monthly training weekend. During the week, the 477th, Alaska’s only Reserve unit, integrates with the active-duty 3rd Wing here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Dana Rosso)

Marines fire an M777 A2 howitzer during a series of integrated exercises at the Combat Center’s Quakenbush Training Area in Twentynine Palms, Calif., April 26, 2013. The Marines are assigned to 5th Battalion, 14th Marine Regiment. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. William J. Jackson

Marines fire an M777 A2 howitzer during a series of integrated exercises at the Combat Center’s Quakenbush Training Area in Twentynine Palms, Calif., April 26, 2013. The Marines are assigned to 5th Battalion, 14th Marine Regiment. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. William J. Jackson

7 Comments

Love the Marines with the gun with the bayonet lug on the end of the barrel.  Great photo!
 
Actually, that's the trailer hitch on the M777.  It folds up all Transformer-like for towing.
 
The Marine gun crew picture looks like a Rennaissance oil painting; the light, billowing clouds, dust, expressions and actions couldn't be better.
 
 Well, the Navy and Air Force are, in the end, about the machines.

The Army and Marines are about the operators of the machines.  So it's apt.

Don't get all butt-hurt, squids and zoomies - it's true in its basic premise.
 
Machine operators, too, can die in battle. When Hood went down, none of the bandsmen got out. They were down in the bowels of the ship, operating the fire control computer. Ginger and Fishcakes, the ship's kittehs, also did not get out, along with all of the humans but three.
 
P.d. Yes, I do think better of fellow bandsmen, and kittehs, than I do of other people. Just a prejudice of mine, that is.  Artillerymen are OK too, I reckon.
 
I counted six shock diamonds in the exhaust of that rocket. The solid propellant rocketeers are pretty good these days.  I have read that they even mix in some HE for more specific impulse.