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Stuff I find in the drawers...

 Which is better than finding it in the couch.  Especially that little one, since I rather think it would not hold up well in that environment.

7.62 Nato, 5.56mm, and 5.56mm caseless.

The caseless is actually new to the Castle.  This one from the early 60's efforts, as I understand it.


10 Comments

Don't let the gungrabbers know that you don't leave a microstamped case behind when you shoot it!
 
Good point, Geoff!
 
Ok, I know that -in a normal gun- the shell seals the breech so the pointy-thing goes forward.

Just how does that work with a caseless round? Or do the designs differ?
 
Wow, that looks so very different from my caseless rounds.
Still, very cool, although, I'd agree that the finding of the caseless round in the couch could very well be much less fortunate than finding loose change.
0>;~}
 
Speaking of ammo, (not meaning to thread jack), anyone know where a guy could pick up a few hundred rounds of 22LR? I have checked all of the major websites plus local and have struck out.
 
The only caseless ammo-firing rifle I'm familiar with is the HK G11, which used a rotary bolt.
 
Don't forget your Land Pattern Brown Bess: bite cartridge, pour powder down barrel, insert paper cartridge and ball, seat with ramrod.  prime, close frizzen, cock, ready to fire.  Caseless, right?
 
John:

For a short while in the 60's, Daisy marketed a .22 rifle that fired a caseless cartridge. Interesting design, used a jet of hot air to ignite the propellant, and as I recall quite successful. I still have one of the rifles, a brick of 1000 rounds, and a letter from an exec at Daisy explaining why they decided to drop the gun and get out of the non-airgun market.
 
 Yeah - BATF said it was a firearm and they weren't licensed for same. *That's* a good score, sir!
 
I have an ammo collection, too. Sort of. Here are two 55 grain .223 in nylon cases. 

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