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So, why did the Armorer post those pics yesterday...

...without any real verbiage?

And such crappy pics?

With no embiggenation?

Easy.  Just to see what you'd do.  And you didn't disappoint, you figured it out.  +10 to Raging Tachikoma for his perspicacity and snarkage.  John (JPJ) did ID the M1903, but quit too early to qualify for any prizes...  ;^ )

And J(NTA) even provided the snark about the Navy not trusting sailors with firearms!  Collectively, you guys embraced your inner Armorer.

The top picture was indeed, a Parris-Dunn Mark 1 USN training rifle, with the black plastic bayonet.



And the second picture was indeed a US Army M1903 Springfield rifle mounting the M1905 bayonet, for comparison purposes, and to see who would figure it out.



7 Comments

 When I was in boot (summer '72) we marched with Springfields. First time I stripped the bolt I noticed there was no firing pin. I doubt there was 1 round of .30-06 on the base.
 
The Corps of Cadets drill team(s) use 1903s...the ones the use for practice just look so wrong with the fiberglass stocks.
 

And you didn't disappoint

Sounds like John is channeling his inner Joker... :)


 
During my boot camp vacation of 1976 in beautiful beachtown San Diego, I drilled with a Springfield.  I once examined the bore hoping to catch a glimpse of the rifling grooves.  I could not see through the plugged bore, so I inquired, "Sir, why is the recruit's rifle bore plugged?"  The answer was to prevent us from aiming the rifle at ourselves in an awkward moment of cleaning from the muzzle end and accidently shooting our "foot" off and generating additional paperwork for the Recruit Company Commander, in fewer words.  I often wondered if a bore full of lead equalled the weight of a fully-loaded rifle.
 
 Interesting... I went to Great Lakes for basic in 1973 and our 1903A3's were functional if badly in need of some oil.  Bores were clear with decent rifling, too.  
 
I have it on good authority that the Brigade of Midshipmen currently parades with perfectly fine M-14s excepting that the bores are filled with lead.  Must be a squid thing.
 
 The bores at Orlando were clear and my rifling was in pretty good condition. Juts the fireing pin was removed so we wouldn't accidently shoot ourselves whil cleaning our piece, which was very unlikely to have any ammo since the closest ammo for the thing was at a gun shop in Orlando. ISTR, the few Marines there had M-14s.