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Speaking of maintenance nightmares...

 I just can't imagine that cooling unit does all that well in that location.  But I'm clearly wrong, or they wouldn't do something like that, right?  Anyway, Stryker-types - what's that thing for?

A U.S. Army Europe Stryker Mobile Gun System, assigned to 2nd Cavalry Regiment at Rose Barracks, Germany, moves across the Grafenwoehr Training Area during Saber Junction 2012, Oct. 13. U.S. Army Europe's exercise Saber Junction trains U.S. personnel and 1,800 multinational partners from 18 nations ensuring multinational interoperability and an agile, ready coalition force. Photo by Markus Rauchenberger

A U.S. Army Europe Stryker Mobile Gun System, assigned to 2nd Cavalry Regiment at Rose Barracks, Germany, moves across the Grafenwoehr Training Area during Saber Junction 2012, Oct. 13. U.S. Army Europe's exercise Saber Junction trains U.S. personnel and 1,800 multinational partners from 18 nations ensuring multinational interoperability and an agile, ready coalition force. Photo by Markus Rauchenberger

11 Comments

I read elsewhere it was to remove a significant "thermal bloom" and to think our previous government wanted to buy these instead of Leopard 2's.....
 
That would make sense, Colin, since it covers the exhaust.  I was wondering if it was one of the magical energy conservation/generation devices the boffins have been fiddling with.
 
 It's also likely that the specification for vehicle occupant/computer cooling was NOT written with actual Sandbox conditions in mind, and real-world experience required something to boost the cooling capacity, especially for the comm equipment and gun-aiming computers.
 
It isn't the boom box???
 
I thought it was a fold-down hovercraft attachment.
 
Top secret device that folds down 90 degrees and converts the vehicle into an air cushion vehicle to evade IEDs.
 
Its the Fan unit that runs the AC.   All Of our Up-Armours had them in Iraq.  Kind of an After-Market adaptation for the heat over there.  All that Armour overheats the Comm, IED countermeasures, and crew pretty quick.  This is a stop-gap until the next Model comes out. 
 
What 0341 said.  The Stryker AGS has a big problem with internal heat build-up, to the point that crews in Iraq in the summer were in serious danger of heatstroke after only  a few hours of operations.  I don't know whether that external system runs a convenetional air cooler or is designed to feed cold fluids to crew cooling vests to keep body core temps down.  But it is an add-on system installed to deal with a problem that was identified only after the AGS was deployed to theater.
 
 I was leaning to that explanation, while I was willing to consider the exhaust cooling as a strawman.  I understand the cooling vest system initially produced the dichotomy of fried electronics from the heat while the crews were suffering hypothermia from the cooling vests...

This was the first view of a Stryker I'd seen in a long time where it didn't have slat armor on it, which makes that unit stand out.

Strykers aren't that common around here... and being in my 12th year of retirement, I find things are really slipping away.  Which is funny, since I've been involved in studies involving the Stryker - but we don't do engineering-level studies out here in central 'Murica.  We do the operational and doctrinal ones.
 
You guys are all way way off.

That thing is an "Aim Here" device for RPG gunners. Under our current ROE and theory of civilized warfare, we must give the enemy ample opportunity to win or else we can be deemed Unfair and penalized with a substantial loss of UN Favor Points.
 
Saw a similar but smaller  thing attached to a trailer hitch on the back of an SUV the other day.  I'm thinking it's the fold out 6-burner propane stove for the tailgate parties. 

George V.