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Neccessity is the mother of invention...

And these guys are some seriously inventive mofos.   <===(You *seriously* want to click that link - the article is chock full of embiggenable pics of this stuff!)

 A Libyan rebel fighter, in a vehicle rigged with armor plating, flashes a victory sign at a territory taken from forces loyal to Muammar Qaddafi, after rebels pushed several kilometers in the direction of Zlitan, west of the rebel-held port city of Misrata, on June 13, 2011. (Reuters/Zohra Bensemra)
A Libyan rebel fighter, in a vehicle rigged with armor plating, flashes a victory sign at a territory taken from forces loyal to Muammar Qaddafi, after rebels pushed several kilometers in the direction of Zlitan, west of the rebel-held port city of Misrata, on June 13, 2011. (Reuters/Zohra Bensemra)
 

Also of note is the typical crappy storage most 3rd world military equipment suffers from.  But at least the rebels understand the importance of clean ammunition.

20 Comments

The rebels drink Pepsi?

Maybe I should reconsider which side to support...
 
Necessity is the mother of strange bedfellows.

Most of all that was taken from a Wiley Coyote manual.
 
What's in Photo #25?
 
That looks like an FN 2000, with grenade launcher and possibly a silencer.
 
I'm surprised at the English stenciling on those Russian multiple rocket launchers.  I would have expected either Cyrillic or Arabic.  Are they, perhaps, not Russian?
 
Roger, they look like UB32s, which have a lot of users, including the Israelis.
 
#11 is my favorite.  And I like the guy in the chair in #18.  I think he's just trying to shoot-push himself backwards.
 
The Russians stencil English instructions on their export stuff, since more people in their client states (both former and present) speak English than Russian. All the Saddam-era stuff I saw in Iraq had English instructions and/or data stenciled on it -- the ChiCom stuff all used Chinese characters and Arabic numerals.

Ummmm -- what *we* call Arabic numerals, not real Arabic numerals, which don't resemble what we call Arabic numerals, despite supposedly being the inspiration for what we call Arabic numerals.
 
I have lust in my heart for what ever that is in pic 25.
A Steyr sumthing????
 
 They're 'Indian numerals' not 'arabic'. They were originally developed for use in casinos being proposed for tribal lands.

Cheers
 
Gond, Hmar, Bodo, Chenchu, or Dimassa?

Although I hadn't heard the Indian government was becoming involved with casinos...
 
Several captions ID the pod as a UB-32.

Toluca, I have to wonder what #11 was doing with one glove on; Michael Jackson fan? As for #18, I'm channeling Foxworthy: "If you try to shoot down jets from your La-Z-boy, you might be a redneck..."

Except for the rocket pod mod, and the truck armor, I don't see a lot of actual modifications, although I get a flashback to Road Warrior from #33, or maybe Death Race 2000. :)

Reloading the RPGs looked quite inventive, if not completely safe. And I have to wonder if Toyota appreciates the product placement in #30. Then again, this is the region which gave us the "technical" in the first place.

 
I thought the matches in the pic where the guy was unloading the explosive from the mines was a nice touch.  Think he was smoking?
 
I have to wonder what #11 was doing with one glove on;

That's an asbestos glove, so he may be in charge of pulling misfired rockets out of the pod.
 
BillT: You will be happy to know that the Arabs have decided to reclaim their numerals!  What they have been using for centuries were, in fact, Hindi numerals.  Last you, the Gulf States started a drive to get Arab speakers back to using the numerals our ancestors borrowed from them when they realized you can't do long division with Roman numerals.

As to the rest of the language questions: I saw some cyrilic on artillery projos in Saddam's old stockpile, but I don't ever remember seeing any on stuff designed for Air Forces (regardless of country of origin).  Even Saddam's reverse engineered, locally produced aerial bombs were stencilled with Roman letters using the nomenclature of the designing country.  By international treaty all pilots and ATCs are supposed to use English, so most foreign air forces use it for maintenance/servicing as well.  Even exported Mirages come wtih English tech data (how about that?).
 
Yup. The ECM pod for the Mirage 1 I did as a Whatziss a few years back had everything in English, including dataplates and electrical connection port/attaching point labels.
 
 This is a Powerpoint Presentation for “Acquisition 101”. 
 
Won't those primers be useless after dousing them in what looks like oil and water?
 
Most military ammunition is sealed against standard weather, Brad. If you look at milspec milsurp ammo, you'll see the primers often have a purple or red, and I think even green ring around the primers - that's a lacquer sealant.

As long as they aren't pressure washing that ammo, it should be useable, assuming other elements of proper storage (no guarantees there) have been met.
 
#16 says "an armload of rocket propelled grenades".  Forgive me if i am picky, but are those not recoilless rifle rounds?