previous post next post  

Ditching as Motivation: US Airways 1549, Two Years Later

I know lots of people get bitten by the flying bug, based on various flying experiences, but this is a tad out of the ordinary. 

Hey...whatever works...

Only one drawback I can see: if you actually know a little about flying and have experience piloting an airplane, sitting in the back is a little less comfortable than it is for those who are blissfully ignorant. You pick stuff up that others don't, but you just have to grin and bear it.

5 Comments

Dusty has that right! Several years ago I caught the Allegiant Air flight to Vegas from the Loveland/Fort Collins airport- which can handle an MD80 but only just...
So it was 1500 hours on a Friday and about 90 degrees F at 5000 ASL so density altitude was obscene and we went rolling down the runway- everyone had had some drinks so the cabin was filled with cries of "VEGAS! WooHoo!" and the like, everyone looking forward to Sin City!
But mine own self- who has flown in and out of this airstrip in several small machines- is looking out the window at the runway markers going by... nose gear still on the ground... sluggish acceleration... runway markers going by... idiots whooping it up...runway markers going by... not much runway left... fist clenching in helplessness...
Then nose up, and we rotated at the very very end of the runway, used every freaking inch of concrete... and I believe I was the only one aft the cockpit bulkhead with a clue.
Sometimes ignorance is bliss, I guess...
 
Lucky you were not in leadville. (elevation of 9927 ft (3026 m))
 
Neffi - Lucky you were not in Leadville. elevation of 9927 ft (3026 m)
 
 For Neffi the re-run:  www.youtube.com/watch

gunner- you're saying the air in Leadville is particularly heavy?

Cheers
 
Had the same feeling leaving Vancouver for Shanghi on a overloaded airbus, I know the runways well and by 3/4 down and the aircraft still on the ground, I was not very happy. flew allegiant to Vegas and return to Belligham, serious windshear at around 1,000' . Everyone was aware how hard it was for the pilots, lots of cheering and clapping when we landed safely.