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NATO @ War

Polish Prime Minister Donald Tust speaks with several Polish soldiers during his visit to Forward Operating Base Ghazni, Afghanistan, on the Polish Armed Forces Day, Aug. 15. Tusk was also accompanied by the operational commander of Polish Land Forces, Gen. Bronisław Kwiatkowski. (Photo by Polish Warrant Officer Robert Suchy)
 
Polish Prime Minister honors Soldiers on Armed Forces Day

By Polish Captain Katarzyna Szal/Bogumiła Piekut

GHAZNI PROVINCE, Afghanistan - The Polish Prime Minister Donald Tust, along with Gen. Bronisław Kwiatkowski, the operational commander of Polish Land Forces, met with Polish and American Soldiers at Forward Operating Base Ghazni, Afghanistan, on Poland's Armed Forces Day, Aug. 15.

"I pay homage for courage, sacrifice and heroism of all polish soldiers, here in Afghanistan," said Tust, addressing the Polish soldiers in a speech.

Tust made sure he emphasized how proud all Polish citizens are of their soldiers serving in Afghanistan. He also paid respect to Capt. Daniel Amboziński, who was killed in Afghanistan a few days prior.

The Prime Minister said, the day of courage for Polish soldiers in history came after a day of mourning for the next hero in polish history.

"Polish soldiers risk their own lives, so future Poles and Polish soldiers will not have to pay this price by Vistula River," said Tust, referring to the famous river that covers half of Poland. 
 
And fight they do, with courage and sacrifice.  Let's meet a few of them, shall we?

At Landstuhl.  From our Soldier's Angel in Germany:

Mariusz is in the bed. Robert is in the wheelchair. Standing behind Robert from left to right: Robert's brother and I cannot remember his name. He came from Afg where he was also deployed, as a non-medical escort to Robert. He went back yesterday. Next is Rafau, then Krzysztof.
Mariusz is in the bed. Robert is in the wheelchair. Standing behind Robert from left to right: Robert's brother and I cannot remember his name. He came from Afg where he was also deployed, as a non-medical escort to Robert. He went back yesterday. Next is Rafau, then Krzysztof.
We have a bunch of Polish patients here right now. The coalition guys stend to stay longer than American troops so they can receive the type of trauma care and repair surgery not available except at specialized medical facilities like Landstuhl (or in the case of US patients, WR and BAMC). It's nice because we get to know them a little better. And it's wonderful for the staff here because they are actually able to experience patients getting better, rather than sending them stateside after a couple of days and only seeing them at their "worst".

Anyway, they are all paratroopers and you should have seen their faces light up when I gave them their RangerUp! St. Michael the Protector t-shirts!! Of course, the shirts were put on and many photos were taken...

Here's a few of them. Mariusz, the guy in the bed got blown up while driving a Rosomak (it means Wolverine in Polish and is kind of like a Stryker, see photo here) Others were hit by RPG fragments during a firefight and one by IDF while sleeping in his tent.

As our Angel in Landstuhl notes: We got 3 more last week not pictured here, all shot in firefights. I mean, these guys are out there in the shit.

Indeed. 

There are several former foes out helping in Afghanistan - including the Czechs, who were the force I stared at across the border in Germany those many years ago.  Though we really didn't stare at each other too hard, unless the Soviets were snooping around.



*Update: Ooops.  Forgot to credit the Czech pics - which were provided by Heartless Libertarian, currently serving in Afghanistan!

15 Comments

Was that one of my Czech pics John?  Can't see it here (stupid NIPR).
 
Um, yes, and I see I got distracted and didn't credit you, either! 

Which I will go fix.
 
Also of note: the only NATO wounded from last week's car bombed (confirmed - 3 wounded) were from Macedonia (Former Yugoslav Republic of), another formerly socialist country turned ally.  All 3 were gate guards.

None required evacuation, thankfully.
 
...And I wonder how many typical Americans even know the Poles and Macedonians are over there, much less taking casualties. Good on ya, guys!


 
*frantically waving hand*
 
Oh, isn't that just *precious*? 

Bill thinks he's.. "typical." 

Heh. Just like Momma Cairns no doubt feels she's a typical Marine Mom...

Now put that hand down, Bill. You don't know where it's been.
 
But I *am* a typical American! Just watch any John Wayne movie!

Ummmmmm -- okay, except for the parts where he dies...

And my hand's right where it's always been, right at the end of my arm, which has been draped over the back of my chair -- even during Cassie's Double Entendre post...
 
Bill, if you were typical, US forces would be out of Iraq and much farther along in Afghanistan, and we wouldn't be having any reason to post guest posts on Obamacare.
 
I'm thinkin' "our Angel in Landstuhl" needs to watch her language...

As Casey notes, most people don't even realize these guys are there, much less taking casualties. Landstuhl has treated soldiers from 12 countries since the beginning of the War on Te... uh, the Overseas Contingency Operations.

Thanks for giving these guys their props, John.
 
Oh.

Sorry.

*tucking hand back down toward ankles*
 
Oh, I think our Angel in Landstuhl was simply... testifying.
 
Seriously
Hostile
Insurgent
Terrain

Cheers
 
I will add that the Poles aren't operating in one of the safer parts of Afghanistan - their brigade is responsible for Ghazni province, the Pashtun parts of which are definitely not an easy area. (This area also borders on the area where PFC Bergdahl went walkabout.)

For that matter, the French - in southern Kapisa province and the adjacent Surowbi district of Kabul province -  aren't in an easy area either.  So no more French jokes.
 

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I'm looking for info concerns possibility of service in US Army
And I am not typical American :) actually I am not an American at all
I am gonna be grateful for some instructions

 
Hi there
I'm looking for info about foreigners service in US Army
thank in advance