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African-American Representation in Officer Corps Declines.

Oops.  I sense a disturbance in the meme...  mind you - they're *still* over-represented in the officer corps...  So, I gave you the NYT headline, if they bothered to cover the story. 

What's the story?

Having a blast at Remagen - practice throw. Photo by Susanne Kappler, Fort Jackson Leader July 22, 2008  Pfc. Sharaine Furlow, Company D, 3rd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, throws a practice grenade during training July 14 while Sgt. 1st Class Jorge Rosal, instructor at Remagen Hand Grenade Range, observes.
Having a blast at Remagen - practice throw. Photo by Susanne Kappler, Fort Jackson Leader July 22, 2008  Pfc. Sharaine Furlow, Company D, 3rd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, throws a practice grenade during training July 14 while Sgt. 1st Class Jorge Rosal, instructor at Remagen Hand Grenade Range, observes.

Via email:
EXSUM: This report finds that:

1.  U.S. military service disproportionately attracts enlisted personnel and officers who do not come from disadvantaged backgrounds. Previous Her­itage Foundation research demonstrated that the quality of enlisted troops has increased since the start of the Iraq war. This report demon­strates that the same is true of the officer corps.

2.  Members of the all-volunteer military are sig­nificantly more likely to come from high-income neighborhoods than from low-income neighborhoods. Only 11 percent of enlisted recruits in 2007 came from the poorest one-fifth (quintile) of neighborhoods, while 25 per­cent came from the wealthiest quintile. These trends are even more pronounced in the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) pro­gram, in which 40 percent of enrollees come from the wealthiest neighborhoods—a number that has increased substantially over the past four years.

3.  American soldiers are more educated than their peers. A little more than 1 percent of enlisted per­sonnel lack a high school degree, compared to 21 percent of men 18–24 years old, and 95 percent of officer accessions have at least a bachelor’s degree.

4. Contrary to conventional wisdom, minorities are not overrepresented in military service. Enlisted troops are somewhat more likely to be white or black than their non-military peers. Whites are proportionately represented in the officer corps, and blacks are overrepresented, but their rate of overrepresentation has declined each year from 2004 to 2007. New recruits are also disproportionately likely to come from the South, which is in line with the history of South­ern military tradition.
For further information see: Who Serves in the U.S. Military?  The Demographics of Enlisted Troops and Officers over at The Heritage Foundation.

So, what would the New York Times lede be?  Poor Americans Lagging In Access To GI BIll Benefits.

H/t, Tim S. via Jim C.

3 Comments

Hence, the push by Democrats like Charlie Rangel to rectify this situation. They worry that both of these situations will occur:

1) They will lose their ability to sap popular support and political will for war efforts deemed necessary by the Executive Branch, especially if the POTUS is Republlican, by promoting dissent and encouraging massive anti-war and "peace" movements among college-age draft eligible students and disaffected urbanites.

2) Their pool of "qualified" and minority political candidates with millitary and combat experience dwindles, as most veterans will come from other demographic groups that still honor military service and emphasize strength in national defense, intelligence, and foreign policy issues.
 
Heh.  And I was all about satirizing the NYT...
 

Still a way up and out for that 11%, though.

This reminds me of one of the kids from the Marine!Goth's JROTC unit.  His "best" clothes were his uniforms and he admitted to me that his coraframs were his very first pair of  "dress" shoes - ever.  JC had to teach him how to handle the placesetting at his first USMC ball. 

That kid is now a SGT and planning on a career; working on college classes and saving in the TSP.  I am as proud of him as I am of my own kid.