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Real life, non-celluloid heroes. Specialist Monica Brown

Meet Specialist Brown. I'd say we need more like her - except in truth, we have them. They'll be there when the call comes. They almost always are.

Real-life hero: A Soldier’s Silver Star story

080310-A-2013C-009 Army Spc. Monica Brown, a medic from the 782nd Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, stands over Forward Operating Base Salerno in Khost, Afghanistan. Brown is the 2nd female since World War II to win the Silver Star award for her gallant actions while in combat. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Micah E. Clare)

By Army Spc. Micah E. Clare
4th Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – Heroes are made, not born.
And a hero like Spc. Monica Brown, 19, a Lake Jackson, Texas, native is no different. She is the second female Soldier since World War II to be awarded a Silver Star for her gallant actions during combat in Afghanistan in 2007.

She was presented her Silver Star by Vice President Dick Cheney during a ceremony here March 20.
It was dusk April 25, 2007, when Brown, a medic from the 782nd Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, was on a routine security patrol along the rolling, rocky plains of Paktika’s isolated Jani Khail District when her convoy was attacked by insurgents.

“We’d been out on the mission for a couple of days,” said Brown, who at the time was attached to the brigade’s 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment’s Troop C. “We had just turned into a wadi (empty river bed) when our gunner yelled at us that the vehicle behind us had hit an (improvised-explosive device).”

They all looked out of their windows in time to see one of the struck vehicle’s tires flying through the field next to them. Brown had just opened her door to see what was going on when the attack began.

“I only saw the smoke from the vehicle when suddenly we started taking small-arms fire from all around us,” she said. “Our gunner starting firing back and my platoon sergeant yelled, ‘Doc! Let’s go.’”

Brown and her platoon sergeant, Staff Sgt. Jose Santos, exited their vehicle, and while under fire, ran the few hundred meters to the site of the downed Humvee.

“Everyone was already out of the burning vehicle,” she said. “But even before I got there, I could tell that two of them were injured very seriously.”

In fact, all five of the passengers who had stumbled out were burned and cut.
Two Soldiers, Spc. Stanson Smith and Spc. Larry Spray, suffered life-threatening injuries.
With help from two less-injured vehicle crewmen, Army Sgt. Zachary Tellier and Spc. Jack Bodani, Brown moved the immobile Soldiers to a relatively safe distance from the burning Humvee.

“There was pretty heavy incoming fire at this point,” she said.
“Rounds were literally missing her by inches,” said Bodani, who provided suppressive fire as Brown aided the casualties while injured. “We needed to get away from there.”

Attempting to provide proper medical care under the heavy fire became impossible, especially when the attackers stepped up efforts to kill the Soldiers.

“Another vehicle had just maneuvered to our position to shield us from the rounds now exploding in the fire from the Humvee behind us,” Brown said. “Somewhere in the mix, we started taking mortar rounds. It became a huge commotion, but all I could let myself think about were my patients.”

With the other vehicles spread out in a crescent formation, Brown and her casualties were stuck with no-where to go.

Suddenly, Santos arrived with one of the unit’s vehicles backed it up to their position, and Brown began loading the wounded Soldiers inside.

“We took off to a more secure location several hundred meters away where we were able to call in the (medical evacuation mission),” Brown said.

She then directed other combat-life-saver-qualified Soldiers to help by holding intravenous bags and assisting her in prepping the casualties for evacuation.

After what seemed like an eternity, the attackers finally began retreating and Brown was able to perform more thorough aid procedures before the MEDVAC helicopter finally arrived to transport the casualties to safety, Brown said.

Two hours after the initial attack, everything was over.
In the darkness, Brown recalled standing in a field, knee-deep in grass, her only source of light coming from her red head-light, trying to piece together the events which had just taken place.

“Looking back, it was just a blur of noise and movement,” she said. “What just happened? Did I do everything right? It was a hard thing to think about.”

Before joining the Army at the age of 17, the bright-eyed young woman said she never pictured herself being in a situation like this.

Originally wanting to be an X-ray technician, she changed her mind when she realized that by becoming a medic, she’d be in the best place to help people.

“At first, I didn’t think I could do it,” she said. “I was actually afraid of blood. When I saw my first airway-opening operation, I threw up.”

She quickly adjusted to her job, and received additional training both before and during her deployment to Afghanistan.

“I realized that everything I had done during the attack was just rote memory,” she said. “Kudos to my chain of command for that. I know with training, like I was given, any medic would have done the same in my position.”

“To say she handled herself well would be an understatement,” said Bodani, who quickly recovered from his injuries and immediately returned to work. “It was amazing to see her keep completely calm and take care of our guys with all that going on around her. Of all the medics we’ve had with us throughout the year, she was the one I trusted the most.”

Earning trust with a combat unit is not something easily earned, said Army Capt. Todd Book, Troop C’s commander at the time of the attack, but it was something Brown had taken upon herself to prove long before the Jani Khail ambush.

“Our regular medic was on leave at the time,” Book said. “We had other medics to choose from, but Brown had shown us that she was more technically proficient than any of her peers.”

Having people call her “Doc” means a lot to her because of the trust it engenders.
“When people I’ve treated come back to me later and tell me the difference I was able to make in their life is the best part of this job,” Brown said.

During her rest and recuperation in May 2007, Brown visited Spray in the hospital and met his mother.
“I almost cried,” Brown said. “Spray’s mother was so thankful and she hugged me. That was the moment that made me feel the best about what I did.”

Even though she felt proud when she was informed that she was going to receive a Silver Star, she considers her actions to be the result of effort put into her by everyone she’s worked for.

“While I’m not scared to get my hands dirty, I have to say that I never fully became a medic until I came over here and did it first-hand,” she said. “I just reacted when the time came.”

Due to her quick and selfless actions, both Smith and Spray survived their injuries.

080313-A-2013C-006 Army Spc. Monica Brown, a medic from the 782nd Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, takes an Afghan boy's blood at the hospital in Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan. Brown is the second female since World War II to be awarded the Silver Star for her actions in Operation Enduring Freedom XIII. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Micah E. Clare)


080313-A-2013C-006 Army Spc. Monica Brown, a medic from the 782nd Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, takes an Afghan boy's blood at the hospital in Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan. Brown is the second female since World War II to be awarded the Silver Star for her actions in Operation Enduring Freedom XIII. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Micah E. Clare)

Well done, Specialist Brown!

12 Comments

Hoo-ah! I can't hear this story enough. And, it's women's history month. So, you beat me to putting up something. thanks.
 
True. Heroes are made not born. Great young soldier to be decorated with Silver Star.
 
Everyone should read this! I used to think women in service should never be in combat situations, only in clerical or other less dangerous positions. Reading about this and other valorous acts by female military has just about changed my mind! Way to go, Spec. Brown! We're proud of you!
 
Heh. When someone taunts her kids with "Your mother wears Army boots!" the response will be "Yeah! And she can kick yer a$$!"
 
She can kick your a$$ and then put you back together...
 
Doc Brown, Yeah, way to go! I ain't touching any of these lines!
 
Good work Specialist Brown! She kept a cool head under fire. It surely saved some lives.
 
Sorting through the Sousa CDs... Ah! Found it! Cueing up "Daughters of Texas." Former bandsman, at the right of the line.
 
She was stone-cold serious as Cheney pinned her yesterday. DAMN!! That's no giggly 19 year old girl- that's one hella woman.
 
On considering the pics: In pic #1 she looks right earnest and serious, and is careful to observe Rule #3. In pic #2, she looks right earnest and serious, and kinda Iberian-like in her facial features. Sigh. Definitely, if not Kewl&manly, kewl&serious&manlier-than-lotsa-guys,though a gurl. I mean, all that, and she's good-lookin, too! Double sigh.
 
What a role model!!! She has the opportunity to jump out of perfectly good airplanes and then hump her pack, med kit, and weapon over the countryside. I just may start feeling sorry for the other side. NOT!!! Would just love to shake her hand. Maybe a little kiss on the cheek. I'm old...she won't mind.
 
Wow, I love it when I hear good things coming from my beloved Army. This lady is a fine example of American pride. Darlin, thanks to you for all you do and THANKS to all soldiers and everyone else willing to lay it all down just so our families can sleep in peace at night and enjoy the life style we enjoy. My oldest boy just went to Korea about 3 weeks ago and then is heading to Afghanistan after a 1 year stint. Thank you all!