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I got an "A"

Which beats Lex's "B+"

I was unaware of the impact of bond-buying, and disagreed on national defense.

58 of 60, 96.6%. Of course, if I were to use the "feel good" grading system to enhance my self-esteem, I'd make that a 97%, especially since the number actually comes out to 0.96666666666666666666666666666667

Your turn - unless you've already done it at Lex's, in which case you can share your score from that comment stream. Besides, you don't want to embarrass yourself by getting a less-than-perfect score the second time around, eh?

Take the Civics Quiz here. I admit, it's a good thing I'd been brushing up on political philosophy because I'm reading Jonah's Book - Liberal Fascism - which, not surprisingly, is *much better* than Cliff suggested the last time he came to fling poo.

Whether or not you agree with Jonah's premise (it's a polemic, sometimes I think a touch overstated, but mostly well done from my admittedly conservative view of things) it's an eminently readable book that presents many aspects of American political history covered in ways I never got from school, and my own penchant for studying military history did little to fill the gaps. It has been an illuminating read.

18 Comments

I got a 90% when I took it yesterday (at Lex's prompting). Got lucky on the bond question and disagree on national defense as well.
 
i got a 90 this morning, same on national defense and bonds. ...and i don't care if the War of 1812 was a stalemate, the mere fact that we fought them to a stalemate established US as a major world power.
 
...and i don't care if the War of 1812 was a stalemate, the mere fact that we fought them to a stalemate established US as a major world power. Hmmmm. Except that no one in Europe (then, arguably "the world" for all that ignores the rest) really thought so until after the SpanAm War when we finally had a true deep-water Navy and showed we could use it.
 
Guess I'm not quite as brilliant as you folks; since I only garnered an 88.3% (but I beat Lex!) I did, however, get the Bonds and National Defense questions right.
 
93.33% I confused Hume with Locke, and I can never remember if women got the vote in the early 20s or late 20s (1920; just checked Wiki).
 
You answered 56 out of 60 correctly — 93.33%
What's with all the economic questions?
57) The price of movie tickets has increased. According to the law of demand, what is likely to be the result?
The answer is Princess Crabby doesn't care. The Rotation pays for movie tickets and popcorn too.
 
Princess Crabby's answer illustrates the problem... "It's someone else's problem, not mine!"
 
That is correct, it is someone else's problem. I know you are using me as an example for others *not* to follow. However, as long as there is a Rotation, there is no need for me to come around to your way of thinking. Feel free to use me as an illustration to educate others.....I am quite comfortable up here in Boston. I notice you are not making a case for why there were so many economic questions in a civics quiz. Civics is the study of citizenship and government. Where does the price of theater tickets come into play?
 
I got 56 out of 60 93.33%, saw it at Lex's the other day. The reason the econ questions are important is because if we don't understand our economic system, and how laws or regulations will effect that system, we the people will support laws that will harm the economy, leading to more bad laws and so on. Not knowing the basics of how our economy works is just as bad as not knowing the basics of how our political system works, the freedom of both can be legislated away before we know it, not because some evil genious hood winked us, but because we wanted to protect ourselves from the ups and downs of a free market and free political thought.
 
What Andrew said, I no longer need to. 8^ ) And while I was using Maggie in just that fashion - the *attitude* - her answers in fact belie her true knowledge and understanding. The point is that the kids who will make up a large chunk of the electorate is so woefully ignorant of the underpinnings of our society, they will vote for any demogogue, of any stripe, who comes along promising a chicken in every pot, and someone else will pay the bill, and not have the tools with which to analyze the dichotomy. Until they start paying the bills for it. And that won't be until they have to start paying off their student loans with the money left over after taxes from whatever crappy job they got in a tanked economy.
 
Not knowing the basics of how our economy works is just as bad as not knowing the basics of how our political system works, the freedom of both can be legislated away before we know it, not because some evil genious hood winked us, but because we wanted to protect ourselves from the ups and downs of a free market and free political thought. Andrew, I agree on needing to know the basics. However, I think these questions went beyond basics. John - Since I fail so woefully in this area, does this mean you buy the drinks at the next MilBlog conference?
 
Heh. Maggie, when I said, - her answers in fact belie her true knowledge and understanding. , I was referring to this: You answered 56 out of 60 correctly — 93.33% - in that, despite your assertions in text, you *do* know your stuff. Of course I'll buy. The first round, anyway. You can not only outdrink me (as can a goodly number of people) you can drink me into poverty... and unlike the Rotation, I won't even score in recompense for standing the drinks! Not unless SWWBO has changed her mind on certain subjects, anyway!
 
56/60 to 93% Answers to Your Missed Questions: Question #1 - D. 1601-1700 [why did I think Jamestown was at the end of the 1500's?] Question #14 - C. 1901-1925 [er...guess I thought women got the vote in 1929, but that was the depression; 1921...duh] Question #36 - D. The authority of a legitimate sovereign. [dangit...I missed that one last time, too] Question #55 - E. increased for the lower and middle classes and increased most for the upper class. [average household income did not remain the same...duh]
 
PS...I think I said this last time, but someone should have offered me a scholarship by now. :)
 
96.6 here, too. I missed #52 and #58. I was leading at Lex's until Steeljaw showed up.
 
67%. I can be ameriki now?
 
Um, I shoulda wrote #32 and #58. Them's the ones I missed. I have never read all of Tom Paine's stuff, and the thought of bond finances just makes my eyes glaze over.
 
Kat, #1 can be confusing because the first English colony in Virginia was founded in the late 1500s. However, Jamestown wasn't founded until the early 1600s. Apparently you focused on "Virginia" and "first founded," while not processing "Jamestown." So your answer was correct, in a way. :)