Archive Logo.jpg

December 26, 2006

Time for a little Gunner Zen

Canadian Gun Bunnies in the 'Stan.

AR2006-G068-0021 11 December 2006 Sperwan Ghar, Afghanistan</p>

<p>A Gun crew of the 2 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (2 RCHA) fire their M777 artillery gun during a fire mission at Forward Operating Base Sperwan Ghar. You could see the projectile flying throught the air at the end of the barrel.</p>

<p>Joint Task Force Afghanistan (JTF-Afg) is Canada's contribution to NATO’s International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan. The focus of this mission is to help Afghans rebuild their lives, families, communities and nation.  Canadian Forces personnel in Afghanistan are working to improve the quality of life of Afghans by providing a more secure environment in which Afghan society can recover from more than 25 years of conflict.</p>

<p>The Canadian Forces (CF) contribution in Afghanistan comprises about 2,500 soldiers, most of who serve in Kandahar province with a smaller number of personnel assigned to Kabul, various military headquarters, and civilian organizations.</p>

<p>Photo by: MCpl Yves GemusJoint Task Force Afghanistan Roto 2, Imagery Technician<br />

AR2006-G068-0021 11 December 2006 Sperwan Ghar, Afghanistan

A Gun crew of the 2 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (2 RCHA) fire their M777 artillery gun during a fire mission at Forward Operating Base Sperwan Ghar. You could see the projectile flying throught the air at the end of the barrel.

Joint Task Force Afghanistan (JTF-Afg) is Canada's contribution to NATO’s International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan. The focus of this mission is to help Afghans rebuild their lives, families, communities and nation. Canadian Forces personnel in Afghanistan are working to improve the quality of life of Afghans by providing a more secure environment in which Afghan society can recover from more than 25 years of conflict.

The Canadian Forces (CF) contribution in Afghanistan comprises about 2,500 soldiers, most of who serve in Kandahar province with a smaller number of personnel assigned to Kabul, various military headquarters, and civilian organizations.

Photo by: MCpl Yves GemusJoint Task Force Afghanistan Roto 2, Imagery Technician

Interesting difference between the two Armies. If I had a gun position where my gun dogs were serving the piece and *NOT* wearing their helmets, I'd have been relieved.

Near as I can tell, in the Canadian Artillery - if you wear a helmet near the guns, your boss will get relieved...

Y'know, back some years ago, when I went to the Canadian Immigration website, one of the skills that would get you entry was... artillery officer.

The RCHA is starting to look tempting...

And they're getting more new kit.

H/t, Damian, the Babbling Brooks.

Comments on Time for a little Gunner Zen
Heartless Libertarian briefed on December 26, 2006 09:45 AM

Looks like Willie Pete'son deck there. Shake n' bake baby.

Chuck Simmins briefed on December 26, 2006 02:35 PM

They'd look better in jodphurs.

The guy with his hands over his ears... Should he really be standing where he is? Or is it a perspective issue in the pic and he's farther away from the recoil than it looks?

John of Argghhh! briefed on December 26, 2006 03:42 PM

Jodphurs. An inside snark no one else will get.

It's perspective. Not only would I deem he's out of the line of recoil, I suspect he's not even inside the trails.

J.M. Heinrichs briefed on December 26, 2006 07:13 PM

1. Those are the new jodhpurs.
2. What is offensive is mixing TW and DW combats; but they're gunners and ...
3. Helmets? Er, I would point you to the Royal Canadian School of Artillery at Camp Gagetown (NB) where they adjudicate such matters.

Cheers

Pat briefed on December 26, 2006 07:36 PM

The polar fleece jackets in the pic are only available in green Cadpat. It's normally not considered as outerwear. I am surprised that they don't have the Peltor noise cancelling ear defenders. The first time I stood at the back of an M109A2 during a fire mission was interesting. Knowing how far a 155 recoils and standing there while it does so is a whole different kettle of fish.

Pat briefed on December 26, 2006 07:52 PM

I missed the helmet comment in the other thread. Somewhere out of the picture will be a nice neat row of pers kit with shirts, tac vests, helmets and rifles positioned to not interfere with servicing the gun.

John of Argghhh! briefed on December 26, 2006 08:49 PM

I think perhaps we're hearing from the Canadian Artillery School, if only remotely.

I just made the observation that a US gun crew would have helmets on.

Load-bearing gear, etc, might or might not be present on the troops.

I don't have any real problem with the gun position, nor the crew position, though the gunner pulling the lanyard is *technically* incorrect (at least for M109/M198 firing locks) but looks like most I've ever seen pulling a lanyard. He is pulling, not jerking.

Snerk. Don't we all sound like a buncha garret troopers.

Pat briefed on December 26, 2006 11:33 PM

I never spent a day at that school, but one of my postings as a weapons tech was with 1RCHA in Germany. I spent many an hour napping in my M113, waiting for something to break on the gun line. We would have a guncamp in Grafenwohr in the fall, after Fallex/Reforger and in the spring we'd head north to Lager Trauen. I don't recall the base, but it was right next door to the German armour training school. My battery commander then, is Chief of the Land Staff now.

Damian briefed on December 27, 2006 10:16 PM

My battery commander then, is Chief of the Land Staff now.

Was he as long-winded back then as he is now? I just saw him speak to a group of reporters at a symposium, and it was almost painful at times.

John of Argghhh! briefed on December 27, 2006 10:33 PM

Heh. It's the Gunner Disease.

Only surpassed by Gabbling Cavalry.

J.M. Heinrichs briefed on December 28, 2006 01:32 PM

True, Damian, but during a press briefing on how a field exercise was to be conducted, he introduced the Assault Phase by saying "And now we send in the Death Techs".

Gabbling Cavalry? Only talking turkey, since the Arty keeps repeating ...

Cheers

Pat briefed on December 28, 2006 03:11 PM

Gen. Hillier is definitely a better public speaker, to my mind. Gen. Leslie starts sounding like he's giving a lecture whereas Hillier is more down to earth.

Damian briefed on December 30, 2006 02:04 PM

Gen. Leslie starts sounding like he's giving a lecture...

My thoughts exactly, Pat.

Post a comment









Remember personal info?