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January 03, 2007

Jan 3, 1944 (1945) [Dangnabbit!]

SC 198612. Dudelange, Luxembourg. Painted white to blend with snow-covered terrain, an M-36 tank destroyer crosses a field. (3 Jan 1945) </p>

<p>Signal Corps Photo #ETO-HQ-45-5944 (Hustead). <br />

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Hosting provided by FotoTime

Some of these pics should bring back memories for those of you warrriors who did the winter of '81 in Germany - the coldest winter since... 1944. Especially those Jan '81 maneuver rights ARTEPs 1st Tank conducted in the area around Graf and Hohenfels - which, IIRC, were the swan song of the M60A2s, they being swapped for the A3 RISE Passives that spring.

Farkle. I hate typos before my first cuppa joe. Especially published typos.

And I can't use the fig leaf offered... Italy. If only because, well, aside from no where we were in Italy at the time gets that kind of snow, I'd just get hammered for bad captioning.

Sigh.

Comments on Jan 3, 1944 (1945) [Dangnabbit!]
fdcol63 briefed on January 3, 2007 09:33 AM

Thank goodness I missed '81. '82 was cold enough for a FL boy .... especially with no hot water in the A Btry showers! LOL (Ironic, really, when you look forward to a Feb. Graf trip 'cause they have HOT water in the rear area! LOL)

Albany Rifles briefed on January 3, 2007 09:54 AM

I remember it too well.

C/1-26 INF, 1 ID(F). Froze my cojones off! Had a mortar baseplate break in our weapons platoon while firing!

But how about the summer of 1983...so hot we could not move our M113s during daylight since the pavement would melt and the tracks would tear them up....

AFSister briefed on January 3, 2007 11:16 AM

i'm ssssshhhhivering just LOOKING at those pictures.

BRRRRRRRRRRRRRR


anyone for some bodyheat warmup?

Windy Wilson briefed on January 3, 2007 01:12 PM

These remind me of the documentary packaged with the HBO series "Band of Brothers", in which one veteran mentioned that for decades after WW2, whenever it was particularly cold he would say to his wife, "Boy I'm glad I'm not in Bastogne."

Windy Wilson briefed on January 3, 2007 01:12 PM

These remind me of the documentary packaged with the HBO series "Band of Brothers", in which one veteran mentioned that for decades after WW2, whenever it was particularly cold he would say to his wife, "Boy I'm glad I'm not in Bastogne."

Roy Patterson briefed on January 3, 2007 02:07 PM

My dad foughtin France and Germany with the 232nd Infantry (42nd Infantry Rainnbow-Strasbourg,Schweinfurt, Munich etc he told me he tried to keep some dry socks inside his shirt.

I served with the 14th Armored Cav 66-69 and have a few Grafs, Wildfleckens and Hohefehls under my belt my ownself. You cannot forget "The Hawk"!
Roy Patterson

SangerM briefed on January 3, 2007 04:28 PM

I lucked out. I was in the states from Oct 79 through Sep 82. We did a Winter REFORGER in 78, I think it was, with the 1AD vs. 1CAV (we kicked 1Cav butt), and a Jan WinterEx in the 1st AD in 78 or 79 when we did a combat assault river crossing near a town named Hassfurt, (east, I think, of Wurzberg). Very cold that. And of course, I spent LOTs of winters on the border hills looking down on the Czechs. One time, our DF antenna poles froze so bad we had to walk them down (60' of 6" diameter pole, 45lb tops+heavy cables, 8 guy wires in 2 pairs of 4). One antenna pole broke halfway down, and crashed into the snow--$25K worth of damage there--the other we got down ok. I have pics of that ugliness. Brrrr....

Still, the three coldest nights of my life were 1) on Antelope Mound on Ft. Hood in Dec 1974, 2) at about 10,500' ASL on the Big Island of Hawaii while playing aggressors for the 1/35 Infantry platoon ARTEPS in 1975, and 3) some crystal clear winter night at Hohenfels, FRG, during one of our ARTEPS (2/81 Arm vs. 1/41 Inf). I thought I was going to die from shivering that night....

And to make it worse, I was a radar guy for half my time in the Army, so we did everything at night, standing or sitting outside next to a tripod mounted radar. Suffice to say, I've been outside on some cold nights...


J.M. Heinrichs briefed on January 3, 2007 09:22 PM

Wainwright 81, too cold for gasoline to evaporate ...

Cheers

SangerM briefed on January 3, 2007 11:02 PM

My father-in-law was a Navy corpsman in the Antarctic for the first 2 years of Operation Deep Freeze (1955-1957)--Task Force 43. He worked for a Doctor Taylor, whose son is James Taylor, the singer. The ship they arrived on was anchored to an ice shelf, they unloaded a bunch of stuff, and set up tents on the ice. Then the SeaBees went to work building the facilities the scientists would use later. I have scores of pictures of this time and a couple of 'yearbooks'

According to my FiL, his biggest qualification for the job (according to folks who selected him) was his combat medic experience in WWII, and his combat medic experience with the 1st Marine Div at Chosin. I have some pictures of him there too.

When he retired from the Navy he settled in Arizona. He wasn't real fond of the cold to say the least. And of course, he used to tell me that I didn't really have a clue about cold...

He was right, of course.

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