Archive Logo.jpg

November 29, 2006

A few moments of deployed Zen

Marines.
CAMP FALLUJAH, Iraq (Nov. 21, 2006)- Marines from C Company, 2nd Tank Battalion, Regimental Combat Team 5 let loose with the M-1A1 Main Battle Tank's 120 mm main gun. Tankers recently fired on Camp Fallujah's Eagle Range to zero all their weapons, including lanyard firing some tanks for their first shot. Tankers said all the maintenance and care that goes into keeping the tank rolling is worth the effort when they get the chance to fire the Marine Corps' largest direct-fire weapon. Photo by: Gunnery Sgt. Mark Oliva

CAMP FALLUJAH, Iraq (Nov. 21, 2006)- Marines from C Company, 2nd Tank Battalion, Regimental Combat Team 5 let loose with the M-1A1 Main Battle Tank's 120 mm main gun. Tankers recently fired on Camp Fallujah's Eagle Range to zero all their weapons, including lanyard firing some tanks for their first shot. Tankers said all the maintenance and care that goes into keeping the tank rolling is worth the effort when they get the chance to fire the Marine Corps' largest direct-fire weapon. Photo by: Gunnery Sgt. Mark Oliva

Air Force.

Staff Sgt. James Guidry, center, speaks with an Iraqi policeman Nov. 23in the Hy Al-Amil district of Baghdad, Iraq. Airmen from Detachment 7, 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron deploy into the city streets of Baghdad assisting Iraqi police in achieving self-sufficiency. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Steve Cline)

Staff Sgt. James Guidry, center, speaks with an Iraqi policeman Nov. 23in the Hy Al-Amil district of Baghdad, Iraq. Airmen from Detachment 7, 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron deploy into the city streets of Baghdad assisting Iraqi police in achieving self-sufficiency. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Steve Cline)

Navy.

061127-N-8197M-017 Pacific Ocean (Nov. 27, 2006) - Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1617 enters the well deck of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) during onload-offload operations off the coast of Southern California. The LCU brought aboard 80 pallets of ammunition to assist in preparing Bonhomme Richard for a scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Dustin Mapson (RELEASED)

061127-N-8197M-017 Pacific Ocean (Nov. 27, 2006) - Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1617 enters the well deck of amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) during onload-offload operations off the coast of Southern California. The LCU brought aboard 80 pallets of ammunition to assist in preparing Bonhomme Richard for a scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Dustin Mapson (RELEASED)

Army.

November 6, 2006  Pfc. Raymond Purtee, from the 561st Military Police Company, attached to the 10th Mountain Division, provides convoy security during a patrol near Bagram, Afghanistan. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Dexter D. CloudenThis photo appeared on www.army.mil.

November 6, 2006 Pfc. Raymond Purtee, from the 561st Military Police Company, attached to the 10th Mountain Division, provides convoy security during a patrol near Bagram, Afghanistan. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Dexter D. CloudenThis photo appeared on www.army.mil.

Coast Guard.

KODIAK, Alaska (May 22, 2006)--Life rafts and survival kits stream out the back of a Coast Guard C-130 over Hallo Bay after a DeHaviland Beaver float plane operated by Andrew Airways crashed with six people on board. The crash wreckage and survivors can be seen in the right edge of this photo. All six people were rescued by air crews from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak. The Coast Guard rescue coordination center in Juneau received a call at 1:12 p.m. regarding the downed aircraft, which was enroute from Hallo Bay to Kodiak. A Coast Guard C-130 arrived on scene and immediately deployed several life rafts. Two Coast Guard C-130 aircraft and two helicopters, an HH-60 Jayhawk and an HH-65 Dolphin from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak responded to the crash. Both C-130 aircrews and the Dolphin aircrew were diverted from training missions near the area of the crash which saved precious time. The Jayhawk crew rescued four people in the water, and the Dolphin crew rescued the remaining two. All passengers from the Beaver were transported to Kodiak where they were treated for hypothermia and minor injuries. U.S. COAST GUARD PHOTO


KODIAK, Alaska (May 22, 2006)--Life rafts and survival kits stream out the back of a Coast Guard C-130 over Hallo Bay after a DeHaviland Beaver float plane operated by Andrew Airways crashed with six people on board. The crash wreckage and survivors can be seen in the right edge of this photo. All six people were rescued by air crews from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak. The Coast Guard rescue coordination center in Juneau received a call at 1:12 p.m. regarding the downed aircraft, which was enroute from Hallo Bay to Kodiak. A Coast Guard C-130 arrived on scene and immediately deployed several life rafts. Two Coast Guard C-130 aircraft and two helicopters, an HH-60 Jayhawk and an HH-65 Dolphin from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak responded to the crash. Both C-130 aircrews and the Dolphin aircrew were diverted from training missions near the area of the crash which saved precious time. The Jayhawk crew rescued four people in the water, and the Dolphin crew rescued the remaining two. All passengers from the Beaver were transported to Kodiak where they were treated for hypothermia and minor injuries. U.S. COAST GUARD PHOTO

Comments on A few moments of deployed Zen
AFSister briefed on November 29, 2006 07:52 AM

I may be a AF brat, as John so loves to remind me, but that Navy picture is TRES COOL. So is the story about the Coast Guard rescue. The tank picture is verrr nice- love how they caught the firing!

Randy K briefed on November 29, 2006 04:56 PM

including lanyard firing some tanks for their first shot.

What is "lanyard firing"?

I've never heard for that... course I've never fired a tank's main gun either... the two might be related.

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 29, 2006 05:44 PM

In artillery after you re-tube, re-breech, or otherwise fiddle with the gun, you do your first shot with 50 foot lanyard, so that if something bad happens, the crew isn't clustered around the breech. I'd guess tankers do something similar.

Perhaps the treadheads will weigh in.

Eric briefed on November 29, 2006 08:07 PM

When a tank is re-tubed or a recoil mechanism is rebuilt, the first round down range should be using the manual firing device remoted to the rear of the tank. If the turret mechanics did there job right, the round goes down range and the tube and breach don't end up on the turret floor

J.M. Heinrichs briefed on November 29, 2006 09:38 PM

Actually, the preferred course of action is to have the tech, who did the maintenance, fire the first round ...

Cheers