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November 07, 2006

Contrary to what it looks like...

This is not a deck crewman with a fancy control-line helo model... nor is it a crewman of a japanese bomber flying over a WWII aircraft carrier (besides, that war was mostly in black and white...)

No, this is guys I'm jealous of - EOD *and* they get to do stuff like this - dangle from ropes totally at the mercy of Bill Tuttle-types.

Of course, there are few people I'd rather be at the mercy of, if I have to be at the mercy of anybody...

Red Sea (Nov. 3, 2006) Explosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Christopher Courtney assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Six (EODMU-6), Det. 16 assist his team members during Special Purpose Insertion Extraction (SPIE) training from an SH-60 helicopter. The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) is deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Miguel Angel Contreras


Red Sea (Nov. 3, 2006) Explosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Christopher Courtney assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Six (EODMU-6), Det. 16 assist his team members during Special Purpose Insertion Extraction (SPIE) training from an SH-60 helicopter. The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) is deployed in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Miguel Angel Contreras

Comments on Contrary to what it looks like...
cw4(ret)billt briefed on November 7, 2006 12:56 PM

I did some SPIE Rig training (aka "Dope On A Rope") with the ANGLICO for an airshow in 1985. I spent two solid hours doing nothing but inspecting every centimeter of rope, each guy's harness and D-rings, and the wrapping on the attaching rings for the aircraft floor -- and still had my heart in my throat from the time I got 'em off the ground until the time I got 'em back down. If one of 'em had fallen from 1,500 feet, the weight of the paperwork would have equalled the gross weight of the aircraft.

Then they rappelled Ozzie-style from a hundred-foot hover. Now, doing an Australian rappel from a Hubert is a tad different from doing it from a tower or down a rock face -- they descend face first, feet uppermost, as fast as they can slide, and then brake at five feet, which snaps their feet downward so they land upright with their feet planted on Mama Gaia. Which means you *have* to maintain that hundred-foot hover, 'cuz a ninety-four-foot hover (no autopilot, no hover-button, no 3-axis flight director, and a hinky radar altimeter) will have your guys kissing the ground just before they brake and a hunnert-and-six-foot hover will have them swinging through vertical to land flat on their backs. And in either of those instances, you wouldn't *believe* the amount of paperwork involved.

Geez -- no *wonder* I look old...

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 7, 2006 01:04 PM

Which means you *have* to maintain that hundred-foot hover...

You just described the reason I left a no-doubt-still-there dent in Mother Gaia at Air Assault School... failure to maintain the 100-foot hover.

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 7, 2006 01:09 PM

Oh, and you look old because... you are

Big D briefed on November 7, 2006 02:01 PM

Geeze, look at the size of the Rhinos compared to the Bugs. Heck, they look bigger than the friggin' E-2s.

Cricket briefed on November 7, 2006 02:48 PM

I have vertigo just looking at the view. Again, another reason why I am grateful I can be a chick and get away with fainting and sucking down ginger ale or peppermint tea.

You guys so totally rock.

*hugs (C)uddly (W)uddly ol' Sugar Buttons Bill.*

thanks sweetie.

cw4(ret)billt briefed on November 7, 2006 04:07 PM

Oh, and you look old because... you are

*hugs (C)uddly (W)uddly ol' Sugar Buttons Bill.*

*checking roster*

Ooooh-kayyy, only a couple of dozen more folks need to remind me that I'm on the downhill slide and we'll have a *new* record.

Heh -- us guys rock? As in, we're old, grey, stuck in the mud and deaf?

Cricket briefed on November 7, 2006 04:16 PM

You guys rock: dependable, well trained and reliable. Not to mention sexy as all get out in your uniforms and the way you blush when you get squeezed! Oh, and the fact that you do stuff like that before brekkies.

I know I mentioned this oncet to Bubblehead: We toured a nuke sub. We visited the torp room.
We saw where the guys slept. 'Nuff said.

Gwedd briefed on November 7, 2006 05:01 PM

Comrades,

My last tour in the Navy saw my collateral duty as a rescue swimmer, one each, water-insertion, etc.

The most worried time I ever had was the first time I had to drop out of the helo hovering over the water. It was maybe 12 feet, max, but looked like a thousand. Once I was out the door and in the water, everything was cool. But boy.... those last few seconds before leaving the bird were rather, er, exhilerating. Surprised my heart stayed inside my chest.

And yeah, I feel old too.... but I'd give anything to try it one more time:)

Respects,

Gwedd

Eagle1 briefed on November 7, 2006 05:42 PM

Glad to see the Navy photo on your site, though I beat you to it. Just a typical Navy day...

Too bad the Army only does boring stuff.

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 7, 2006 06:49 PM

Too bad the Army only does boring stuff.

Guffaw.

Next question - how many Army pics have *you* posted there, sailor?

J-P briefed on November 7, 2006 07:43 PM

One of our SWAT guys did a rapelling demonstration at a community open house when I was a cadet. Said demonstration consisted of an Aussie rappel down the side of city hall (12 stories) with one hand while firing blanks from an MP-5 with the other. It finished with the landing on some "bad guys" feet first.

His comment on the situation? "It ain't natural, what I just did." But dang, doing this out of a helicopter...?

*low bows and grovels*

Eagle1 briefed on November 7, 2006 08:47 PM

Let's see -"atomic cannon", MLRS, horse cavalry...
probably more.

Cricket briefed on November 7, 2006 09:56 PM

While a small part of me has ever wondered if I could hack it mentally, the honest truth compels me to admit that I am a wimp. I know that training is designed to familiarize personnel with their job requirements and parameters, but
to do this so that it is second nature and covers every detail from the aircraft and equipment used
(not to mention the paperwork)and then do it in a real world situation is bravery beyond understanding.

Taking off from a ship. Landing on same.
Insertions. Parachute jumps. Other Kewl and Deadly Stuff that our military trains its people to do. I hafta ax the question: Who lies awake and night and comes up with this and why?


Outstanding job, gentlemen.

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 7, 2006 10:14 PM

Just checkin' barrister. Just checkin'.

How many destroyers you tried to save? (lays trump on table)

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 7, 2006 10:18 PM

Who lies awake and night and comes up with this and why?

Alla us arrested development adolescents. Why do you ask? 8^)

Eagle1 briefed on November 7, 2006 10:22 PM

Well, John, when I was driving a old Gearing class destroyer around, a lot of time was devoted to keeping it right side up and off the rocks.

I guess I could count that as saving a destroyer.

Although your recent rescue efforts along those lines are most commendable!

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 7, 2006 10:32 PM

Yer right - a more accurate question would have been (not that your answer truly counts, as it was in your personal best interest to keep that sucker afloat) is... how many tanks/howitzers/APCs you tried to rescue?

8^)

cw4(ret)billt briefed on November 7, 2006 10:48 PM

Taking off from a ship. Landing on same.
Insertions. Parachute jumps. Other Kewl and Deadly Stuff that our military trains its people to do. I hafta ax the question: Who lies awake and night and comes up with this and why?

Taking off from a ship is a snap (heh!) and I always landed cross-deck rather than get all tangled in those wire thingies at the blunt end. Who comes up with this and why? Dunno -- but *somebody* has to figger out those games in order to hold our -- ummmmm, uhhh, OH! -- attention...

ry briefed on November 8, 2006 08:47 AM

"You just described the reason I left a no-doubt-still-there dent in Mother Gaia at Air Assault School... failure to maintain the 100-foot hover."
Yeah, about that dent? The Earth Firsters of California have contacted me to inform you that Gaia filed a claim there and she's looking to collect, so .....

John of Argghhh! briefed on November 8, 2006 09:00 AM

Tell her to send it to the rookie pilot who hovered at 110 feet.